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Twitter is considering expanding 140-character limit on tweets

Your hot takes might soon not be limited to 140-character tweets.

Twitter is considering expanding its 140-character limit on tweets, according to Re/code. The feature will allow users to tweet things longer than the traditional limit, and the company is reportedly targeting a launch date toward the end of Q1.

The limit is expected to be expanded to 10,000 characters, which is what the direct messages feature was expanded to in August of 2015.

The effort into removing the character limit is to bring potential users in, or those who have tried Twitter, but have been turned away because of the character limit, as well as the reverse chronological timeline.

Twitter has seemed to evolve pretty well over the years. The removal of the character limit in direct messages was received mostly with praise, as a character limit on them just seems unnecessary. The character limit in tweets has been countered with services like TwitLonger and Branch, and most popularly and effective, bloggers and journalists alike have posted pictures of bits and pieces from articles as a preview, with a link to the full text.

Depending on how the limit is removed, would be quite interesting. Re/code describes the removal as a feature. That would be a big difference from your general, average tweet’s character limit being removed.

A feature would perhaps be better than making every tweet essentially limitless, since it would apparently look something like this:

That’s a lot. That might be enough to burn whatever device it is that you’re using to navigate Twitter if the take is hot enough. The internet might not be ready for that. It might also attract your uncle who hates three-point shots in basketball, instant replay, and touchdown dances to Twitter. You don’t want that.

This note is also crucial.

Not to mention, a 10,000 character tweet just sounds like a blog post. As I mentioned before, a feature enabling more characters wouldn’t be so bad, but every tweet?

Please don’t.

[Re/code]

(editor’s note: this blog post is roughly 2,000 characters long. Imagine five of these posts as one tweet!)

Harry Lyles Jr.

About Harry Lyles Jr.

Harry Lyles Jr. is an Atlanta-based writer, and a Georgia State University graduate.

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