MikeMoran

College football coverage: You be the editor

College football previews have started hitting the racks, and, according to clandestine bathroom surveillance, time spent reading on the toilet is spiking.

But is what you’re reading worth what you just deposited?

I’m a new contributor on CBR and will be popping in and out as we lead up to what looks like the final season of the BCS era. I wanted to introduce myself with attempted toilet humor and by also forcing you to do my job for me.

So please answer the following questions in the comment section.

Thanks. You’re my favorite reader.

3 Mutually Beneficial Questions for a College Football Writer and Fans

1. Ultimately, why are you reading preseason coverage?

I would be willing to bet 75 percent of you read, for example Phil Steele or David Purdum on CBR, in preparation to gamble on the upcoming season. You’re certainly not reading either of the above for their eloquent writing.

You’re looking at stats and which teams have which players back, right? And you want to know this before you bet on the huge open South Carolina at Vanderbilt game. The Gamecocks are 10-point favorites, by the way.

Am I wrong? Is my belief that three of four college football fans–more specifically ones reading online blogs–are financially invested every Saturday of the season?

2. Which stats are the most important in today’s college football?

I called Las Vegas professional sports bettor Ted Sevransky to find out. Teddy is the real deal, a part of the every-day lifestyle of a professional sports bettor in Las Vegas. These guys make a living by correctly prioritizing the stats that make up their computer power rankings.

“Red Zone stats have become crucial, especially in college football,” Sevransky said. “The teams that are efficient in the Red Zone, both ways on offense and defense, in general should be good bets.”

Another wise guy, Mike Moran, nephew of Bugs Moran, added a little insight into what he looks at during the preseason:

3. What do you want included in a general team preview?

I asked this question publicly at two places I know college football fans hang out – Twitter and a gambling forum. Returning starters seem mandatory, but I thought this suggestion was intriguing from “tray:” 

“Seeing a comparison of the # of offer letters each starter received on both the offensive and defensive lines out of high school. Now, I think it’s widely understood that in college football wins and losses are built on the backs of the guys on the offensive and defensive lines. It would be great to see that from a sheer talent perspective which lines are seemingly more talented. I know that kids develop a lot and grow once they get into college by leaps and bounds, but on raw talent alone, who has the most skilled guys in the trenches?”

In conclusion, let me help you by providing the most valuable type of coverage leading up the season. I just need to know what that is.

I leave you with the odds to win the 2013 BCS Championship at the Las Vegas Hotel & Casino SuperBook and where to find me on Twitter, @DavidPurdum.

ODDS TO WIN 2013 BCS NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP GAME
SUN LIFE STADIUM — MIAMI, FLORIDA
MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 2013

LSU 5
ALABAMA 5
OREGON 8
USC 9-2
OKLAHOMA 7
GEORGIA 12
FLORIDA ST 15
ARKANSAS 25
VIRGINIA TECH 25
TEXAS 20
CLEMSON 30
MICHIGAN 30
WEST VIRGINIA 40
NOTRE DAME 30
MICHIGAN ST 40
NEBRASKA 40
SOUTH CAROLINA 30
WISCONSIN 50
TCU 60
BOISE ST 40
BAYLOR 500
MISSOURI 100
STANFORD 200
OKLAHOMA ST 100
FLORIDA 60
AUBURN 100
KANSAS ST 200
UTAH 300
CALIFORNIA 300
GEORGIA TECH 300
PENN ST 100
MISSISSIPPI ST 100
TEXAS A&M 200
IOWA 200
BYU 200
TENNESSEE 200
LOUISVILLE 300
WASHINGTON 300
NORTH CAROLINA ST 300
VIRGINIA 500
ILLINOIS 500
WASHINGTON ST 500
CINCINNATI 500
WAKE FOREST 500
ARIZONA ST 500
SOUTH FLORIDA 500
ARIZONA 500
UCLA 500
BOSTON COLLEGE 500
FIELD 60

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