BOSTON - JANUARY 01:  The Dropkick Murphys perform before the game between the Philadelphia Flyers and the Boston Bruins during the 2010 Bridgestone Winter Classic at Fenway Park on January 1, 2010 in Boston, Massachusetts. The Boston Bruins defeated the Philadelphia Flyers 2-1 in overtime.   (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)

Dropkick Murphys turned down the NHL’s offer to play the Winter Classic

The NHL is routinely criticized for its music selections at major events. Whether its the All-Star Game or the Winter Classic, the NHL has a history of questionable musical decisions. The 2016 Winter Classic featured the American Authors, Simple Plan and Nate Ruess from Fun. Though the lineup was far superior compared to the 2012 Awards Show which featured Nickelback, fans questioned why other options such as the Dropkick Murphys weren’t invited.

It turns out the Dropkick Murphys were invited, but they turned the NHL down because the league asked them to do a duet which would have made no sense.

Via Boston Magazine, lead singer Ken Casey spoke about the situation and the Bruins’ bad loss:

“Also the reason we didn’t play is because the NHL asked us to do a duet with the guy from FUN. And that would not have been fun. Disheartening game. Lots of hype for such a let down.”

Why would the NHL make such a request? The Dropkick Murphys played the 2010 Winter Classic which was also held in Boston and it was well received. Instead of doing more of the same, the NHL tried to play their hand at musical creation and incorporate the lead singer of Fun. The Dropkick Murphys turned the offer down – no surprise there – and the NHL continued its tone deafness as far as music is concerned.

David Rogers

About David Rogers

Managing Editor of the NHL blog Puck Drunk Love and contributing writer for The Comeback and Awful Announcing. Firm believer that Ray Hudson is the most entertaining commentator in sports.

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