The finale of the PGA Tour’s FedEx Cup playoffs starts today at East Lake Golf Club in Atlanta, Georgia.

All 3o players in the field have a mathematical shot at the $10 million FedEx Cup prize, while the top 5 players in the points standings (Dustin Johnson, Patrick Reed, Adam Scott, Jason Day, Paul Casey) control their own destiny; if any of them win the tournament, they’re guaranteed the season-ending FedEx Cup prize as well. And on top of all that, there’s still one U.S. Ryder Cup slot available, to be announced Sunday night at halftime of Sunday Night Football on NBC.

The 30 players got here after surviving post-event cutdowns at the Barclays, Deutsche Bank, and BMW. The Tour Championship is a no-cut event, which obviously makes sense with just 30 men playing, and it means that, more than normal, just about anyone in the field can win. Even a rough opening round or two can be corrected by going really low on the weekend.

The Course

ATLANTA, GA - SEPTEMBER 27:  Jordan Spieth of the United States hits his tee shot on the 18th hole during the final round of the TOUR Championship By Coca-Cola at East Lake Golf Club on September 27, 2015 in Atlanta, Georgia  (Photo by Scott Halleran/Getty Images)
ATLANTA, GA – SEPTEMBER 27: Jordan Spieth of the United States hits his tee shot on the 18th (now 9th) hole during the final round of the TOUR Championship By Coca-Cola at East Lake Golf Club on September 27, 2015 in Atlanta, Georgia (Photo by Scott Halleran/Getty Images)

East Lake Golf Club was the home course of Bobby Jones, and has served as the host of the Tour Championship every year since 2004. Is that because it’s a legendary course with plenty of history, including the 1963 Ryder Cup won by the USA behind playing captain Arnold Palmer? Sure.

But is it mostly because Coca-Cola is a major sponsor of the tour and the event, and the course is about 15 minutes from Coke’s headquarters, meaning they get to treat plenty of clients to the tournament action?

Absolutely.

Much of the talk leading up to the tournament has been the flipping of the front and back nine, done mostly to make the 18th a par 5 instead of a par 3. But that change probably isn’t going to make much difference until the 72nd hole on Sunday. The players will face a classic Donald Ross designed par-70, stretched out to more than 7,300 yards. In addition to the length, the rough serves as the course’s main defense, with fairways rewarding players more here than elsewhere on tour.

Oh, and there’s an island-ish green par 3, too, that might play from 200 yards.

Good luck!

So, who’s going to win?

CARMEL, IN - SEPTEMBER 10:  Matt Kuchar hits his tee shot on the ninth hole during the third round of the BMW Championship at Crooked Stick Golf Club on September 10, 2016 in Carmel, Indiana.  (Photo by Scott Halleran/Getty Images)
CARMEL, IN – SEPTEMBER 10: Matt Kuchar hits his tee shot on the ninth hole during the third round of the BMW Championship at Crooked Stick Golf Club on September 10, 2016 in Carmel, Indiana. (Photo by Scott Halleran/Getty Images)

Well, that’s still a pretty foolish thing to try to answer, as always. But with the more limited field, it’s going to be someone you’ve likely heard of, at least. I’ll start at No. 30 and work my way to No. 1, with the usual caveat that golf is a silly game and just about anyone can win any week.

30. Jhonattan Vegas

The powerful Venezuelan was only eligible for one major this season, the PGA, but by virtue of making it to East Lake he’ll be automatically qualified for all four majors next year. (Which applies to everyone in the field this weekend, yet another incentive provided by the playoff system.) He did win the RBC Canadian Open in August, and could very well play well, but he lands at the bottom because someone has to.

29. Sean O’Hair

A renaissance year for O’Hair, who started the playoffs with a T2 at the Barclays, then held on to make the finals, finishing T53 and T52 in the other two playoff events. It’s hard to imagine his year finishing on the sort of high note a Tour Championship win would mean; plus he hasn’t won a tournament since 2011.

28. Jason Dufner

Duf has his typical machine-like swing, but his putter has killed him this season. He ranks just 168th in strokes gained putting. That’s not good. And likely not good enough against a field like this one.

27. Charl Schwartzel

Similar to Dufner, Charl has a great swing, and it’s worked well this year, getting him into East Lake as the 30th man. But his putting numbers (128th in strokes gained on the green) make it tough to rank him much higher.

26. Hideki Matsuyama

There’s a trend here, if you’re reading closely. Matsuyama is masterful in the long game but very poor around and on the greens. Could he go on a tear and capitalize on his overall ability? Sure. But probably not.

25. Matt Kuchar

Yes, he’s one of the top-ranked players in the world, yes he was just named to the Ryder Cup team, yes he played college golf at Georgia Tech and therefore has experience on the property. But I just don’t think he’s going to win. He’s played plenty here before and hasn’t really contended. Plus, he’s normally worn down by this part of the calendar, just in time to play poorly at the Ryder Cup.

24. J.B. Holmes

He hits it far. T4 at BMW. Generally streaky on the green.

23. Brandt Snedeker

He putts it well, and won in 2012 en route to the FedEx Cup title. Hasn’t won since February.

22. William McGirt

Won the Memorial. T20 at the BMW, but missed the cut the week prior.

CARMEL, IN - SEPTEMBER 08:  Phil Mickelson hits his third shot on the seventh hole during the first round of the BMW Championship at Crooked Stick Golf Club on September 8, 2016 in Carmel, Indiana.  (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)
CARMEL, IN – SEPTEMBER 08: Phil Mickelson hits his third shot on the seventh hole during the first round of the BMW Championship at Crooked Stick Golf Club on September 8, 2016 in Carmel, Indiana. (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)

21. Phil Mickelson

Whoa, lefty comes in pretty far down the list, despite being a two-time winner at East Lake. But he’s not realistically playing for much, and it’s not a real major, nor is it the Ryder Cup, and if 2016 Phil isn’t motivated to that degree it’s rare that he contends to win.

20. Kevin Na

He’s hot right now, and in theory on the periphery of the Ryder Cup conversation. Could surprise.

19. Emiliano Grillo

A dangerous player, putting together a strong finish to a strong season, but he hasn’t managed a win since last fall. This would be a big stage to get back to the winner’s circle.

About Jay Rigdon

Jay is a writer and editor for The Comeback, and a contributor at Awful Announcing. He is not a strong swimmer.