The Colorado Rockies certainly have a number of questions surrounding their future with the impending free agency decision of shortstop Trevor Story. Though they are likely to be losing Story, the MLB franchise made a move on Wednesday that will certainly soften that blow a little bit.

Reports have come out that the Rockies are signing former Chicago Cubs and San Francisco Giants star Kris Bryant to a massive seven-year, $182 million contract that will keep the slugger in Colorado through the 2028 MLB season.

Bryant is obviously an extremely talented player, but many around the MLB world are questioning this massive contract considering the team paid for a large portion of former star third baseman Nolan Arenado’s contract to send him off to the St. Louis Cardinals.

Bryant had what most consider to be a down year in 2021, splitting time between the Cubs and Giants and hitting 25 home runs and 73 RBIs with a .265 batting average and .353 on-base percentage. Those numbers will certainly increase in the hitters’ paradise that is Coors Field, but it is still a perplexing move on the surface considering how they didn’t want to pay Story to stay with the organization.

This trade could see a return of Bryant’s MVP-type numbers that he put up in 2016 when he won the award. But still, it seems a little strange that the organization would give Bryant this kind of money given their reluctance to pay players in the past.

For reference, this contract is by far the biggest that the organization has ever given out to a free agent, with the second biggest being a full $61 million less in 2000 to pitcher Mike Hampton.

It could pay off for the team given Bryant’s talent, but they are still looking at a pretty weak roster outside of the former MVP. If the fit doesn’t work out this could certainly be a contract that the team looks back at in disgust for years to come.

[Jeff Passan]

About Reice Shipley

Reice Shipley is a staff writer for Comeback Media that graduated from Ithaca College with a degree in Sports Media. He previously worked at Barrett Sports Media and is a fan of all things Syracuse sports.