Kyler Murray

The Arizona Cardinals made their feelings about starting quarterback Kyler Murray very clear this offseason, agreeing to terms on a massive contract extension that will keep the two-time Pro Bowl quarterback with the team through the 2028-29 NFL season.

Arizona clearly feels very confident that Murray will be the quarterback to lead them to postseason success, making the huge investment of $230.5 million, which includes $160 million guaranteed, over the duration of the deal.

While many within the organization have been singing the praises of Murray, there is a strange clause in this new contract extension that is certainly raising eyebrows around the NFL world. According to NFL insider Ian Rapoport, there is an addendum in Murray’s contract that requires him to do four hours of “independent study” per game week.

In the statement from the Independent Study Appendum posted by Rapoport, Murray will have to do an “independent film study,” which is material provided by the team aside from the mandatory meeting throughout the week during the season.

While this is a great thing for both the Cardinals and Murray as they prepare for the upcoming season, it is a bit strange that they need to ask him to do this in writing instead of that just being chalked up as an expectation as a starting quarterback in the NFL. And people around the NFL world certainly noticed.

It certainly shows a level of mistrust between the Cardinals and Murray that this needed to be involved in the contract. Given the massive amount guaranteed to the quarterback in this contract, you would expect that he wouldn’t need to be monitored to watch game film on his own time.

Murray is obviously a great athlete, and this could be a great thing for his career moving forward, but if this contract clause is any indication, he has a long way to go if he wants to be among the elite quarterbacks in the NFL.

[Ian Rapoport]

About Reice Shipley

Reice Shipley is a staff writer for Comeback Media that graduated from Ithaca College with a degree in Sports Media. He previously worked at Barrett Sports Media and is a fan of all things Syracuse sports.