Tom Brady

The last few weeks have seen plenty of discussion about if Tampa Bay Buccaneers’ quarterback Tom Brady would in fact retire this offseason, with that intensifying following the Bucs’ Jan. 23 playoff loss against the Los Angeles Rams. Well, as per ESPN’s Adam Schefter and Jeff Darlington, it now looks like Brady (seen above after a Jan. 16 playoff win) is indeed retiring:

Brady’s company then seemed to confirm this:

Update: This now appears a little more uncertain, as @TB12Sports deleted that tweet, and Brady’s father denied the news. And Bally Sports’ Michael Silver and the Tampa Bay Tribune‘s Rick Stroud reported that Brady has not yet told Bucs’ GM Jason Licht this:

However, ESPN added a “we stand by our reporting” statement, which they issued to Kyle Koster of The Big Lead:

At any rate, Darlington and Schefter eventually published this piece on the news. And if Brady is actually retiring, that is definitely news: Brady’s retirement was certainly discussed, especially with him turning 44 last August, but it wasn’t certain. And a large part of that is how remarkably well he’s continued to play into his 40s. This year in particular, he threw for a career-high 5,316 yards; some of that is about a 17-game season (he started every game), but he only previously hit 5,000 passing yards once, with 5,235 in 2011.

Brady also posted 43 touchdowns against 12 interceptions this season. So if he had wanted to continue playing, that certainly would have been possible, and probably desired by the Buccaneers (especially considering that their current backup is…Blaine Gabbert). And while it’s not yet 100 percent clear this retirement will hold, it’s already seen a lot of reactions on Brady’s career. Here are some of the Twitter reactions to this report of Brady’s retirement:

As noted above, though, there is still some uncertainty here. We’ll update this post when it becomes more clear if Brady is retiring or not.

[Photo from Kim Klement/USA Today Sports]

About Andrew Bucholtz

Andrew Bucholtz is a staff writer for Awful Announcing and The Comeback. He previously worked at Yahoo! Sports Canada and Black Press.