This Weekend in NFL Stupid highlights the dumbest moments and decisions in football throughout the season. Coming out of Week 16, we’re focusing on TWIS regular Mike Tomlin.

The stupidest of the stupid

On a 4th-and-5 from his own 42-yard line with a four-point lead in the final five minutes of regulation, Tomlin’s Steelers went for it. But it wasn’t just any fourth down gamble. It was a fake punt. And it wasn’t just any fake punt. It was a fake that required a 248-pound fullback who runs a 4.8-second forty to rush for five yards up the middle.

It’s one thing to go for it there, but it’s another thing to take the ball out of the hands of your future Hall of Fame quarterback, who would have had a chance to target one of his two star receivers on that play.

Tomlin got cute in a decisive moment, and it might have cost his team a playoff spot.

But that wasn’t Tomlin’s only miscue in New Orleans. He also neglected to challenge this potential Michael Thomas fumble in the second quarter…

And on a key third-play play in the fourth quarter, he inexplicably allowed the fumble-prone Stevan Ridley to carry the ball. The result? You guessed it!

Lightning round

That being said, the booth — not Tomlin — dropped the ball by failing to review this…

And come on…

Rookie mistake…

Allen Robinson with one of the stupidest moments of the year…

Final stupid word

We might not get many more Marvin Lewis specials, so let’s enjoy this one. Lewis’ Bengals scored with 2:56 remaining to move to within one score of the Browns. But then, despite the fact they had zero timeouts remaining, the Bengals kicked deep rather than attempting an onside kick.

They of course never got the ball back.

No math in the world would support that decision, especially considering that the Bengals have a bad defense and nothing to lose. It’s almost as if Lewis wanted to lose.

A reminder…

About Brad Gagnon

Brad Gagnon has been passionate about both sports and mass media since he was in diapers -- a passion that won't die until he's in them again. Based in Toronto, he's worked as a national NFL blog editor at theScore.com, a producer and writer at theScore Television Network and a host, reporter and play-by-play voice at Rogers TV. His work has also appeared at CBSSports.com, Deadspin, FoxSports.com, The Guardian, The Hockey News and elsewhere at Comeback Media, but his day gig has him covering the NFL nationally for Bleacher Report.