28 Nov 1999: Kurt Warner #13 of the St. Louis Rams runs to pass the ball during a game against the New Orleans Saints at the Trans World Dome in St. Louis, Missouri. The Rams defeated the Saints 43-12. Mandatory Credit: Elsa Hasch  /Allsport

A statistical look at the 21 years the Rams spent in St. Louis

The St. Louis Rams are no more. Here’s what you need to know about the 21-year run the team had in the Gateway to the West.

142-193-1: That was the Rams’ record during their 21 years in St. Louis. Only four teams — Oakland, Detroit and Cleveland — had lower winning percentages. They ranked a respectable 19th in terms of points scored but 30th in terms of points allowed.

83-85: That was their record at Edward Jones Dome. Again, only Oakland, Detroit and Cleveland were worse.

671: That’s how many turnovers the Rams committed while representing St. Louis. Ironically, the only team with more turnovers during that stretch is the Arizona Cardinals (709), who played in St. Louis until 1987.

7: The Rams had two seven-time Pro Bowlers (Torry Holt and Orlando Pace). Isaac Bruce and Marshall Faulk were both four-time Pro Bowlers and Steven Jackson and Kurt Warner made it three times. Probably no coincidence that all six of those guys were offensive players. Pace, Faulk and Warner were there only multiple first-team All-Pros.

41: Altogether, they had 41 Pro Bowlers in 21 seasons. Only eight played defense.

89: Despite everything Warner, Holt, Bruce and Faulk did during the “Greatest Show on Turf” days, the longest play in St. Louis Rams history was an 89-yard Tre Mason run in 2014. (Warner did, however, have three touchdown passes of 80 yards or more.)

18: That’s how much they trailed by in the biggest comeback in St. Louis Rams history, which took place in 1998. After falling behind 28-10 in the third quarter, they came back to beat the Bills 34-33. The also blew an 18-point lead against the Saints in 2001.

19: That’s how many Rams games went to overtime. They won nine, lost nine and tied one.

42: The oldest St. Louis Ram was 42-year-old punter Sean Landeta (2004). The youngest (just ahead of Todd Gurley) was defensive back Jacoby Shepherd, who was four days beyond his 21st birthday when he debuted for St. Louis in 2000.

41: Their winningest quarterback was Marc Bulger, who went 41-54 over an eight-year stretch. Warner started only 50 games in St. Louis but won 35 of them. Sam Bradford came in third with 18 wins despite starting 49 games.

23: That’s the number of starting quarterbacks they used, although 44 players threw at least one pass for the St. Louis Rams.

179: That’s the total number of games Bruce started — a St. Louis Rams record.

6: That’s the number of playoff games they won, which was tied with Minnesota and Dallas for 14th in the NFL during that span. Five of those wins came between 1999 and 2001, when they went to a pair of Super Bowls (winning one, in ’99).

5: That’s the total number of years they made the playoffs. Only five teams (Buffalo, Chicago, Oakland, Houston and Cleveland) made it less often.

4: That’s the total number of winning seasons they had (only Oakland and Cleveland had fewer), compared to 15 losing campaigns (nobody had more).

2: They were one of nine teams to make multiple Super Bowls during that 21-year span, joining the Patriots, Steelers, Giants, Seahawks, Broncos, Packers, Colts and Ravens.

2: That’s the total number of players — Faulk and Aeneas Williams — in the Hall of Fame who suited up for the St. Louis Rams, although that could soon change with Warner and Pace both finalists in 2016.

Brad Gagnon

About Brad Gagnon

Brad Gagnon has been passionate about both sports and mass media since he was in diapers -- a passion that won't die until he's in them again. Based in Toronto, he's worked as a national NFL blog editor at theScore.com, a producer and writer at theScore Television Network and a host, reporter and play-by-play voice at Rogers TV. His work has also appeared at CBSSports.com, Deadspin, FoxSports.com, The Guardian, The Hockey News and elsewhere at Comeback Media, but his day gig has him covering the NFL nationally for Bleacher Report.

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