Nebraska's Memorial Stadium

The spreading national anthem protests have dipped onto the college football fields, and now some college football players are receiving racist reactions over their decisions to express their freedom of speech. Nebraska linebacker Michael Rose-Ivey took a knee along with two teammates (Mohamed Barry and DaiShon Neal) prior to Nebraska’s road game at Northwestern over the weekend, and he told reporters he has heard criticisms involving the N-word being hurled in his direction.

Unacceptable. Fortunately, Rose-Ivey is much more rational in his reactions to what can only be described as racist numbskulls having too easy access to contacting players in 140 characters or fewer.

“Some believe DaiShon, Mohamed and myself should be kicked off the team or suspended, while some said we deserved to be lynched or shot like the other black people who have died recently,” Rose-Ivey said before collecting himself. “Another believed that since we didn’t want to stand for the anthem that we should be hung before the anthem at the next game.”

The national anthem protests continue to be quite the boiling point for some, but players will continue to use the moment to stand out for what they believe in, which is their constitutional right as outlined by our country. It is OK to have a difference in opinion in how that message is carried out, but it is nobody’s right to verbally attack those who take a knee during the national anthem, especially when it crosses a line like this supposedly has for a few college football players and more professional athletes.

People hiding behind their keyboards and monitors are doing nothing but demonstrating why these players feel a need to take a knee. Get over your unpunishable keyboard muscles and start focusing on seeing what you can do to assure those who take a knee no longer feel a need to take a knee.

[ESPN]

About Kevin McGuire

Contributor to NBCSports.com's College Football Talk, Athlon Sports and The Comeback. Host of the No 2-Minute Warning Podcast on iTunes, Stitcher Radio and iHeart Radio. FWAA member and Philadelphia-area resident.